Faithless…new writing, unedited…

Konan and Lilly waited until all the forensic people finished. Before the rain washed away all traces of the footprints Ashley mentioned, Konan walked over and looked at them.

Most of them were washed out, no longer viable as evidence. From what he saw, they led to the tunnels. Whatever happened here there was little evidence left to support a theory.

“Whatcha looking at?”

“Those footprints Ashley mentioned, Lilly.”

“Do you think this was a murder?”

“Who knows? The prints are washed out. From what I could tell, they seemed to lead into the tunnel. In this kind of weather, we’d have to get very lucky to make a case for murder.”

“Yeah,” Lilly said around a yawn. “That’s what I figured too.”

Once the techs got their equipment loaded into their van, Konan and Lilly left the scene. The drive back was made in silence, not an uncomfortable one that hung in the air like smothering humidity, but one that was like a gentle understanding between two friends.

Lilly pulled into the parking garage and shut off the car. Konan unbuckled his seat belt and got out of the car. They had nothing pressing to do, so Konan considered going home. Lilly had her phone out and typed furiously on the keyboard.

“I’m out of here, Lilly. I’ll see you in the morning.”

“Okay. I’ll pick you up. Ashley wants to see us at 9.”

“Why?”

“I don’t know. She sent a text and said be here at 9.”

“Okay. I’ll see you then.”

Konan walked down the ramp and headed for the bus stop. The rain had ceased, and he made it to the stop in time to catch the last bus of the evening.

Life was a strange creature sometimes. One moment you’re on top of the world, the next you were sprawled out over the train tracks and half the man you used to be.

Konan walked into his mobile home, tossed his wallet and keys into the small square basket that sat on top of his small shelf, and made himself a cup of coffee. For once, his mind was at ease. He sipped the coffee and put in his headphones. Smooth jazz poured out of the earbuds and calmed his mind even further.

After his coffee he eased into the shower and dressed for bed. A white tee and blue pajama bottoms completed his outfit, and as he crawled between the sheets, he thought of the body sprawled across the tracks.

“What a horrible place to die. All alone, and no one remembers who you are.”

Then, Konan fell into a dreamless slumber.

At 0830, Lilly pulled into the driveway and blew the horn. Konan walked out into the morning sun, the humidity already at 90 percent hung in the air like a wet blanket, a blanket that was tied around your neck and mouth that threatened to strangle you if you resisted.

He climbed into the unmarked car and buckled up.

“Morning,” Lilly said.

“Hey.”

“So, Ashley made an ID on our ‘suicide.’ It’s a doozy.”

“Okay.”

“I’ll let her tell you.”

“Alright, so you’re the appetizer to Ashley’s main course?”

“Yeah, something like that.”

Once again, they rode in silence until they reached the morgue. So much time had passed between Konan and Lilly, they both were comfortable with the other, both recognized the need for silence.

Besides, things would not stay silent for long. It never did.

Both of the detectives walked into the morgue at exactly 9 a.m. sharp. Ashley waited for them at the front desk.

“Good morning, you two.”

“Morning,” Konan and Lilly said in unison.

“Come on back. I signed you both in.”

As was the custom, everything in the morgue was white and sterile. The smell of bleach was as suffocating as the humidity outside.

Ashley led them into her office and shut the door. She walked around a mid-century desk and sat down, while motioning for the two detectives to have a seat.

“We’ve got a problem. You guys remember that missing person case, where one of the members of The Trinity disappeared?”

“Yeah,” Lilly said. “One of the founding members went nuts and left not the blonde, Yvonne. One of the men…”

“What about it, Ashley?”

“Your victim, he is the missing Trinity member.”


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